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Letters

  • Misguided lament

    To the editor:

    In response to Walter A. Carolus’ May 29 letter: I attended public schools until 1949. In the fifth grade, I was sent to Catholic schools through 12th grade. In those days, Protestants supported separation of church and state, so my parents paid local school taxes and tuition. The separation was so strict, I was not allowed to ride the public school bus to the local public school a block from my school.

  • Name-change police go too far

    To the editor:

    Common sense is dead. With all that is going on in this country, our Senate is involving itself in a controversy that is absolutely none of their business.

    It is claimed that the name “Redskins” offends many Native Americans. I am sure that some are offended. The “politically correct” police are calling for change but are not suggesting many replacements. I don’t think the Washington “Indigenous Americans” is going to make the cut.

  • Emperor has no clothes

    To the editor:

    As a senior citizen, I never thought that I would have to follow the example of a child who told the truth in the fairy tale, “The Emperor’s New Clothes.” Election-year decisions made by political leaders in Raleigh and Brunswick County reminded me of the tale.

  • Immigration laws trampled

    To the editor:

    Last year, the Beacon published my letter in which I took to task the misguided notion that illegal immigrants are deprived unfortunates lurking in the shadowy underworld of our American culture. Many boldly and brazenly flaunt their illegal status and openly demand U.S. citizenship in addition to the many benefits they already have acquired illegally.

  • Kudos to Laura Lewis

    To the editor:

    Thank you to Laura Lewis for the great and honest column concerning the Memorial Day services in Calabash.

  • Expensive decision

    To the editor:

    Last week, school board members voted to return to traditional start times at all 19 schools in our district. This vote was done without public input or discussion, an under-the-radar-type vote ensued, and our educational leaders are saddled with the consequences of an ill-advised policy change.

    This change is calculated to cost more than $1.75 million this year. We have to purchase buses, hire drivers, lose state dollars through reductions in efficiency ratings, and more.

  • 17 million kids deserve better

    To the editor:

    Seventeen million kids are being raised in poverty by full-time or multiple-job parents. Handicapped kids struggle every day. I’ve lived it for 54 years because of my experience raising an uninsurable handicapped daughter.

    These children struggle every day with hunger and fear of loss of a roof over their head, not to mention the embarrassment of not having money for any school activity.

  • Selfish drivers make crash response worse

    To the editor:

    I was appalled to witness the worst mass selfish ignorance I’ve ever seen in my 57 years while bumper-to-bumper on N.C. 211 on May 19 because of the horrific school bus accident up the road.

  • It is possible to avoid hell

    To the editor:

    What is hell like? God’s word says it is eternal separation from God (Matthew 25:34, 41, 46). What does eternal separation from God look like? It speaks of continual torment (Luke 16:22-23, 41 and 46. 2 Thessalonians 1:8–9). It tells of someone in hell begging for water and wanting someone to warn his family of his torment (Luke 16:24).

  • A divided Union

    To the editor:

    President Washington was leery of political parties, as the most passionate on each side of a policy issue often become unbending. A union, such as a marriage, a partnership, or even our Congress, requires understanding and tradeoffs to function. The shorthand my wife and I use is “this for that.” At its simplest form, I cut the grass as she does the laundry, each appreciating the other.